Queerly There 04: The Gay, The Bad, And The Dead

Queerly There 04: The Gay, The Bad, And The Dead

Content Warning: discussions of violence (specifically towards queer women), murder, death, rape and misogyny.

In this episode Rowan discusses some possible explanations for why there are so many dead and/or evil queers in our media. Then gets mad about it. There may be an attempt at a snooty straight person accent.

If the salt gets a touch depressing in this ep, take care of you and get yourself a cup of tea and a blanket or something.

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Sapphic Skywalkers: Not Safe For Kids

Sapphic Skywalkers: Not Safe For Kids

Today, Lynn and Natalie talk the new Last Jedit Trailer! Then we move on to talk about totally Jedi badass, Luminara Unduli. We are then join by Amy Wishman to discuss why violence seems to be appropriate for kids but not queer relationships or characters.

You can find the podcast on Twitter @SapphicSkywalk and you can email us at [email protected]. You can also find us on the Not Saf for Work podcasting network feed and website where you can also check out some other cool shows!

Sapphic Skywalkers: Don’t You Forget About Shmi

Sapphic Skywalkers: Don’t You Forget About Shmi

This week, Lynn and Natalie talk about a character who deserves everyone’s love and admiration: Shmi Skywalker, First of her Name, Mother of Jedi and Legends. Then we delve into the larger topic of older and more “motherly” characters being sidelined and not seen as marketable.

You can find the podcast on Twitter @SapphicSkywalk and you can email us at [email protected]. You can also find us on the Not Saf for Work podcasting network feed and website where you can also check out some other cool shows!

Where are the Women?: A Star Wars Story

Where are the Women?: A Star Wars Story

Warning for Rogue One spoilers.

For how much we commended Lucasfilm on its great strides towards gender diversity since The Force Awakens, I think a lot of us forgot to look more closely at Rogue One until it was already out. Not everyone—god knows I been pointing out the severe lack of women since last year alongside some friends—but enough. After Phasma, Rey, Maz and Leia, and the diverse background characters in The Force Awakens, perhaps it was too easy to become complacent. Too easy to believe that once we’d taken that step forward, it was impossible to fall behind again.

Well, apparently fuckin’ not, because Rogue One barely even tries, if I’m completely honest. The tough-white-brunette-as-lead doesn’t really make up for a distinctive lack of other women anymore—not that it ever should have. As much as Rogue One seemed to want to cling to some Star Wars traditions, the sole-white-female-heroine-among-men is one that should have been thrown right out with the opening crawl (though I remain forever broken-hearted at the lack of the crawl).

Especially when the ancillary material is working more than it ever has to create a diverse galaxy, introducing women like Admiral Rae Sloane, Doctor Aphra, Cienna Ree, Shara Bey, Brand, Sabine Wren, and even more amazing women who veer away from the typical Star Wars films’ leading lady. I would give anything to see any of these women, or women like them, on the big screen, and it’s disappointing to watch Rogue One fail when so many other stories within the universe succeed. Especially because I know Star Wars can do better. Especially because I love Rogue One as much as I do.

Read More

To See Ourselves in Fiction

To See Ourselves in Fiction

I’ve always been that person who constantly and consistently fights for other people–be it for better or worse–but has never worried too much about herself. When it came to representation in media, I’ve always been vocally backing up that yes, we need trans people, we need people of colour, we need asexuals and aromantics and all the other facets of the LGBT+ umbrella.

But I never really worried about myself, I never felt I needed to see people I identified with in the shows, books, games and movies I love. Sure, I was bitter at the utter refusal from shows like Orange is the New Black to use the b-word (bisexual, the word is bisexual), but I reiterate that actually seeing a bi gal on the silver screen didn’t feel vital to me. Other people needed (and still do need) that representation more.

And then The Legend of Korra happened. Read More